Elmgreen & Dragset at the V&A

The end of last week brought me to Tomorrow, Elmgreen & Dragset's new exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Musem (V&A to you London locals). If you're like me, you might best know Elmgreen & Dragset best as the dudes who did Prada Marfa, which is basically a real/fake Prada store that just so happens to be located in my dad and sister's birthplace of Texas.

E & D, let's call them, are known for their site-specific, immersive art exhibits, and this one didn't disappoint.  Located over five galleries, Tomorrow  transforms the museum's former textile galleries into a flat of sorts that belong to a fictional character named Norman Swann. Intrigued? Creeped out? Me too.

 

Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat
Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat
Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat
Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat

Upon arrival, you'll receive a play written by ol' E & D which explains the past, present, and future of Norman's flat and his life. I won't say much more because part of the fun of Tomorrow is learning - and exploring - as you go.

Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat
Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat
Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat
Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat
Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat
Elgreen & Dragset at the V&A - Second Floor Flat

Visitors are encouraged to interact with the exhibit by wandering around, opening books, etc. This all felt similar to Punchdrunk's immersive theatrical performances, which I'm hesitant to even say. After all - it's hard to lay claim to an idea, especially in the world of art. Dontcha' think?

Regardless, the show was great and makes a comment on the cultural value of historical property which, especially in a place with as much history as ol' England, is always a interesting topic.

Not a fan of E & D? Go for the walk to the exhibit alone. You'll find yourself wandering through areas of the V&A you may didn't even know existed.


Tomorrow  opens, well, tomorrow and runs through January 2nd. Admission is free, and you can watch a film featuring interviews with the artists as they planned the exhibit (and take a peek at their gorgeous Berlin studio) here